The Immortal Rules

the imortal rules coverAllison Sekemoto survives in the Fringe, the outermost circle of a walled-in city. By day, she and her crew scavenge for food. By night, any one of them could be eaten. Some days, all that drives Allie is her hatred of them—the vampires who keep humans as blood cattle.

Until the night Allie herself dies and becomes one of the monsters.

Forced to flee her city, Allie must pass for human as she joins a ragged group of pilgrims seeking a legend—a place that might have a cure for the disease that killed off most of civilization and created the rabids, the bloodthirsty creatures who threaten human and vampire alike. And soon Allie will have to decide what and who is worth dying for again.

 

First thing first, yes this is a vampire book. Yes 99 percent of vampire books created in the post-twilight vampire fetish “how the heck did this get published” cringe-worthy love triangle angsty “don’t love me, I’m a monster” era were absolute garbage, so much so that even the word vampire will get your book tossed out of the publishing house faster than you can say “sparkly vampire abs”, there are several things that put Julie Kagawa’s The Immortal Rules above the rest.

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Fluffy Pink Evil

Do you remember the scene in Monty Python and the Holy Grail where the knights decide to enter the cave because all they see is a cute fluffy bunny guarding the entrance? Then, so gruesome it’s comical, most of the knights get their throats torn out while everyone screams and runs in horror?

Image result for monty python rabbit

Yeah. I love that scene.

The Young Adult novel Hearts and Body Parts by Ira Bloom reminds me of this little guy. Much like the story itself, the cover without the jacket on is pink on the outside, and jet black on the inside. I don’t think that’s a coincidence.

Let me give you an example. Here is a quote from Chapter 10:

“It’s me first day. Dead brill, your outfit.”
He was English. Katy had never thought about it before, but an English boy was definitely what she’d been waiting for her whole life. “You too,” she replied.

Now, here is a quote from Chapter 52:

He steeled his mighty body and heaved, and [spoiler]’s remains slid out in a wash of visceral fluids and black ichor, a jumble of body parts and splintered bones. Many parts were still recognizable, like a petrified heart, a mangled foot still in a shoe, a bifurcated skull, and a piece of forearm with a Rolex wristwatch still ticking away.

So yes. This book goes full Rabbit of Caerbannog on us. I love it.

Having bought this book and finished it in a day, I must solidly recommend it to anyone who enjoys a little fun, but who wont run screaming when the Japanese, corpse eating demon cat comes into play.

You can read the full review of Hearts and Other Body Parts here.